Jesuits World Wide 
 

 

 

Jesuits World Wide

The Society of Jesus, whose members are known as Jesuits, is a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1540. Their ideals of love and service, faith and justice are lived concretely in their dedication to impart quality education over the past 450 years. Serving in 112 nations on 6 continents, we number nearly 20,000 priests, brothers, and seminarians worldwide, all of whom observe vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. The Jesuits, according to Ignatius, should be ready to undertake in any part of the world, work which will be for the "Greater Glory of God" (the Jesuit motto: Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam).

Enriched by their rewarding tradition and experience in the field of education, Jesuits offer a holistic formation emphasizing the development of the whole person, head and heart, as an individual and as a member of society. To enable the students to become men and women for others, the Jesuit education insists on academic excellence, critical thinking, creative research and overall personality development that include character, moral courage to be free to make the right choices and commitment to the poor and marginalized.

Jesuit education has been historically successful in many cultures because it is eminently adaptable to the environment of the learner. Jesuit education is adaptable to many diverse learners. Present and future learners can expect Jesuit education to continue to adapt in appropriate ways to meet their evolving needs.

India and the United States rank among the most important countries in regard to the size of the Jesuit educational undertakings. In the USA there are no fewer than 45 Jesuit Universities, and 75 high schools. In other Asian countries such as Japan, Nepal, Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam, the Jesuits conduct reputed schools and university establishments, which make a notable contribution to the education of their youth. The situation is the same wherever the Society of Jesus has established itself.